ASTRONOMY PICTURE OF THE DAY:
This is just another blog run by a die-hard science enthusiast. If you like astronomy and if you like pictures, you have come to the right place. Stay curious my friends.
Celestial Seagull
Like a parrot perched on a pirate’s arm, the Seagull Nebula resides in one of the spiral arms of the Milky Way.
This new image, released by the European Southern Observatory on February 6, shows a closeup of one of the “wings” of the Seagull Nebula. Red clouds of hydrogen gas glow from the intense ultraviolet radiation given off with the birth of stars.
The entire nebula is actually comprised of three large gas clouds arranged in the shape of a bird.

Celestial Seagull

Like a parrot perched on a pirate’s arm, the Seagull Nebula resides in one of the spiral arms of the Milky Way.

This new image, released by the European Southern Observatory on February 6, shows a closeup of one of the “wings” of the Seagull Nebula. Red clouds of hydrogen gas glow from the intense ultraviolet radiation given off with the birth of stars.

The entire nebula is actually comprised of three large gas clouds arranged in the shape of a bird.

Reblogged from s-c-i-guy  15 notes
s-c-i-guy:

The Faces of ‘Wave at Saturn’

“This collage includes about 1,600 images submitted by members of the public as part of the NASA Cassini mission’s “Wave at Saturn” campaign. On July 19, 2013, Cassini maneuvered into a special location to take a picture of the Saturn system backlit by the sun. Blocking out the sun’s rays also enabled Cassini to take a picture of Earth, which would normally require looking almost directly at the sun and risking damage to the cameras’ sensitive detectors. The “Wave at Saturn” event was the first to tell earthlings in advance that their picture was being taken from interplanetary distances.”

The fact that my face may very well be included in this grouping of 1,600 other small pieces of history has gotten me in a fit of excitement. Here’s to us, humanity, for coming together even if it was for the briefest of moments.

s-c-i-guy:

The Faces of ‘Wave at Saturn’

This collage includes about 1,600 images submitted by members of the public as part of the NASA Cassini mission’s “Wave at Saturn” campaign. On July 19, 2013, Cassini maneuvered into a special location to take a picture of the Saturn system backlit by the sun. Blocking out the sun’s rays also enabled Cassini to take a picture of Earth, which would normally require looking almost directly at the sun and risking damage to the cameras’ sensitive detectors. The “Wave at Saturn” event was the first to tell earthlings in advance that their picture was being taken from interplanetary distances.”

The fact that my face may very well be included in this grouping of 1,600 other small pieces of history has gotten me in a fit of excitement. Here’s to us, humanity, for coming together even if it was for the briefest of moments.

Reblogged from s-c-i-guy  2,366 notes

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Panoramic view of the WR 22 and Eta Carinae regions of the Carina Nebula
This spectacular panoramic view combines a new image of the field around the Wolf–Rayet star WR 22 in the Carina Nebula with an earlier picture of the region around the unique star Eta Carinae in the heart of the nebula. The picture was created from images taken with the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile.

Credit: ESO